Fashion Anarchy Relaunched: a fashion designer competition in St. Louis

Fashion Anarchy Relaunched is a premier fashion designer competition that will be streamed live July 30, 2020 from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM (EST) in St. Louis by brainchildevents.com.

Fashion Anarchy 2020 Participants will be given 48-hours for each event to create one look based on a concept/theme given to the designer and team.

The sequel to Pins and Needles Designer Competition, Fashion Anarchy takes the concept to a more industry-related event. The Preliminary Challenge (Events 1 and 2):

Participants will be given 48-hours for each event to create one look based on a concept/theme, fabric and hair/makeup team given to the designer. Each Fashion Anarchy preliminary Live-Stream event will consist of three designers. The winner of each event will advance to the final in November.

Dates:
1. July – 1st Round [July 30 ] – Live Stream
2. August – 2nd Round [August 25 ] – Live Steam
3. November – FINAL COMPETITION [November TBD] – Onsite

Protesters Occupy St. Louis City Hall until Mayor Krewson Resigns

Protesters now occupy St. Louis City Hall vowing to have a presence 24/7 until Mayor Lyda Krewson resigns. Some followers of ExpectUs and Action St. Louis were there among others that just wanted to join in and see justice served to Krewson who endangered constituents by giving out names and addresses of people who wrote letters demanding police reform during a Facebook live broadcast.

More than 50 percent of most all city budgets go to public safety but crime keeps rising. We should at least try to reallocated some of these funds to our communities. For example create a recreation center out of an old building the city owns, improve infrastructure, start a work program/club/group for troubled and disenfranchise youth, start a beautification group to get federal grants for flowers to plant around the city.

ExpectUs: Five Point Protest Campaign

  • Defund Police
  • Disarm or Train Police in Deescalation
  • Free Political Prisoners
  • Close The Workhouse
  • Reparations – funds to under served communities
Protest Encampment at St. Louis City Hall will stay until Mayor Lyda Krewson resigns.

Protesters spent the night with plenty of water and snacks to hold them til morning. The tents were sprawled neatly across the lawn which looked more like an camp site.

There was a tent that advertised Legal Support STL with the phone number to call at 314 312 0863.

It was a sleep over with people playing games with basket balls while others just sat and watched as spectators. It is the only kind of sports you can watch live downtown so people seemed to be captivated.

Reverend Darryl Gray Fighting For Our Rights in CWE, St. Louis

Reverend Darryl Gray protested with ExpectUs to stand up against police brutality in the Central West End neighborhood on July 3 in St. Louis. His cadence kept us inspired to go that extra mile as we marched about two miles down Kings Highway towards Highway 64/40.

Attorney’s Mark and Patricia McCloskey called us protesters thugs and a mob after we protested down their street peacefully while they had guns pointing at us. The McCloskey’s had other names for us as well but Rev. Gray said they got one thing right, “We’re angry.

Reverand Gray continued and said,

You can’t live in America and be black and not be angry. You can’t have compassion for people and not be angry. If you can’t see what’s going on everyday, it’s not just George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Herman, Elijah, Vonderrick, it’s everyday…a different day, it’s somebody else.

Black Trans, black women, black men, this is real for us. So out of everything they said. that is the only thing they got right: that we’re angry. We are not allowing are anger to be destructive; We are allowing our anger to be productive.

Reverend Gray is a good man who is running for the Democratic nomination for State Representative in the 77th District of St. Louis.

COMMENTARY: Until we get good men like Rev. Gray in office, injustice will rule in our Justice System. I think we all can agree that our current system is broken. This is especially apparent during Covid-19 while disproportional black and brown communities continue to have higher death counts vs white communities.

Protester’s Talk Demands at St. Louis City Hall

The Black Lives Matter protest for George Floyd began at the steps of St. Louis City Hall on June 7th. The organizers explained in detail what the protest stood for and voiced their demands to the crowd.

Protest organizers speak out demands at the steps of St. Louis City Hall

Protesters’ Speech at St. Louis City Hall

The reason we planned this protest is because we are tired, tired of the blunt racism, tired of the oppression, tired of the black disregard for black lives shown by police officers within this country. 

We are tired of being tired of being tired. With this we have created a list of demands for this process against police murder.  

Firstly, we demand reparations for the black community. The black community demands reparations  and equity for current and past harms inflicted due to systematic racisim and the wealth that has been extracted from our communities as such. 

We want equity within various political and economic systems that consistently deny us equal lively hood to our non-black counterparts.  

We demand law enforcement needs to be defunded and demilitarized because those funds should be reallocated to the advancement of black communities. 

We demand black people be tried in court by juries consisting of members from their respective black communities.

We demand black people be tried in court by individuals who are directly involved within their respective communities instead of all white juries. 

We demand community control of law enforcement. As stated by the Black Lives Matter movement, this would include the end of the privatization of education and making sure communities themselves have the power to hire and fire officers, determine disciplinary action, control budgets and policies and subpoena relevant agency information when needed. 

We demand the abolishment and reconstruction of the police system from the bottom up.  

Various Organizers of Black Lives Matter Protest

Close The Workhouse Speech by 21 year old from E. St. Louis

Close The Workhouse Speech was eloquently done by a 21 year old gentleman from East St. Louis, Thursday, June 18th in the middle of Hall Street.

CLOSE THE WORKHOUSE in St. Louis has become a popular phrase and an ongoing endeavor with ExpectUs and other protesters.

The Workhouse is inhumane and cost millions to keep running which comes out of our taxes. This Jail is a waste of money, money that could be allocated to city schools, infrastructure, job training and the like.

Juneteenth: Best Dance Party Downtown St. Louis Every Had!

Juneteenth was the best dance party I have ever been to in Downtown St. Louis. Hundreds of people showed up to have fun and dance in front of St. Louis City Hall on Tucker Boulevard, which was a dance floor on steroids.

People gather around cheering dancers in the middle as they out do each other

In the midst of all the trials and tribulations going on, this was a time to forget about work and have some fun. The goal was achieved and then some. It was such a blessing to see everyone, young and old, having such a good time including myself.

Juneteenth was organized by Expect Us, an organization that connects with others and builds bridges with like minded people.

Juneteenth by ExpectUS Presents Dancing on Tucker Blvd. in Downtown St. Louis

The Juneteenth celebration, organized by ExpectUs, had hundreds of people dancing on Tucker Boulevard Friday in front of St. Louis City Hall. The event started around 5 PM and ended a bit after 7 PM.

VIDEO hundreds dance on Tucker Blvd in front of St. Louis City Hall during Juneteenth

In this video they were dancing on the paint that spelled out REPARATIONS but was dry by the time people started dancing.

The speakers where so big they were brought in on a flatbed and stayed there. The stereo itself fit into the DJ’s pocket which was his smartphone.

Juneteenth: Speech then Dancing in front of St. Louis City Hall on Tucker Blvd.

Juneteenth, organized by ExpectUS, had a lots of speakers and lots of dancing during the day that ran into evening on Tucker Boulevard in front of St. Louis City Hall.

South Tucker Blvd. and Market Street were completely blocked off by barricades and guarded by police. This created a huge party space and dance floor. There were hundreds, young and old, who took to the street to dance to their favorite songs.

Crowd dances on Tucker Boulevard in front of St. Louis City Hall during Juneteenth.

Angel, an activist and community speaker, talked to the crowd about equality and the meaning of Juneteenth. Immediately following was the dancing and fun.

The stereo was so big it was on a flatbed truck that filled downtown with music and joy. Everyone had a wonderful time and will come next year since Juneteenth is now an annual downtown event.

Juneteenth: Cori Bush Speaks Emancipation, Slavery at St. Louis City Hall

During the Juneteenth celebration Cori Bush, candidate for US Congress 1st District, gave s a powerful speech on the Emancipation Proclamation and slavery at St. Louis City Hall.

Mrs. Bush said, “Every single strike, every single strike that one of our ancestors took. I am saying our ancestors because we are here right now because we had an ancestor there at that moment. Every strike across the backs of our ancestors could have broken them.” The pain slaves endured during lashings was unbearable and inhumane.

“In 1863, this Emancipation Proclamation came forward January 1st that said that we were free.’ Bush continued with, “It wasn’t until June 19 of 1865 that the word made it all the way across the south, lastly in Galveston, TX that said we are unequivocally free.”

Juneteenth: Dancing in the Streets in Downtown St. Louis

Juneteenth was a block party with lots of dancing and fun Friday evening in front of St. Louis City Hall on Tucker Boulevard in Downtown St. Louis. The stereo speakers used were hauled in on a flatbed that filled city streets with music for the first time in a long time.

Juneteenth is a holiday held annually on June 19th which celebrates the emancipation of black people who were enslaved in America. (source wikipedia.org/Juneteenth)

ExpectUS organized the celebration and it was a great success. Tucker Boulevard was turned into the biggest dance floor I have ever seen. Painted yellow on Tucker Blvd. was the word REPARATIONS, which is the right thing to do.

I have joined the Black Lives Matter movement and will fight for true equality in this country. I am old and thought things were getting better until I watched George Floyd’s murder. I was shocked that the other cops did nothing while the crowd was yelling. I then questioned how many murders occur by police that aren’t on film for the world to see.

Now that I am part of the movement, should I fear for my safety? When will I be pulled over, assaulted and put in jail on a trump charge? The famous American phrase “Land of the Free” is a farce as long as black people continue to be enslaved by inequality and the poor reside in the streets.

The people in ExpectUS work tirelessly, putting themselves in danger each time they protest. They bravely do this to make America a better place, a place where true equality will exist one day. more at https://www.facebook.com/FrontLineA1/

Cori Bush Protests Workhouse Jail to “SHUT IT DOWN” Permanently

Cori Bush and other community activists protested to have the Workhouse closed down permanently. This is the dreadful jail that holds presumed-innocent people before a trial, people who are unable to pay for bail after getting arrested. This is unconstitutional.

The citizens jailed at the workhouse consist of mostly black folk and/or the poor. The conditions of the “Medium Security Institution” are abysmal, not fit for humans. Hence our protest.

The presumption of innocence is the legal principle that one is considered innocent until proven guilty. In many countries, the presumption of innocence is a legal right of the accused in a criminal trial, and it is an international human right under the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 11 Source:

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presumption_of_innocence

MUSIC “Time to Go” by Roman P, from Artlist
`Video by craig currie

People Love the Art along Delmar Loop in University City

Artists react by painting boarded up windows along The Delmar Loop and now locals show their appreciation with accolades and verbal kudos in a live survey recorded on video as we talked with people while walking through The Loop in University City.

Artist _stutisinha said, ” Me and Katie, of course are part of the Asian community, wanted to do something inspiring supporting Black Lives. So basically what we’re painting is a tiger which represents Asia, a symbol throughout the continent and then a black panther coming together in this time.”

Artist katiexu1, an Asian American as well stated, “I just wanted to show solidarity with my community supporting the black community. We doing a tiger-black-panther piece and they are coming together to fight the same cause, to fight for equality and justice. “

Some of the boarded up businesses have already taking theirs down and the rest of the boarded up artwork is slated to be auctioned off by the city. The plywood was originally put up in case looting but no such thing has happen in the area.

“Paint The Loop” is a program designed to beautify The Delmar Loop neighborhood in the City of University City. The highly successful program was organized by Jessica Bueler Contractor in University City and Allison Bamberger Director of Communications in University City.

VIDEO: @CraigCurrieSTL | MUSIC: “Brainstorm” by Rex Banner from Artlist.io