Langford Cunningham from Blind City Podcast and Felicia Hampton from The Freeman Bosley Junior Show June 2023

Human Trafficking in St. Louis: 200 Black Girls Missing

Langford Cunningham  from Blind City Podcast and Felicia Hampton from The Freeman Bosley Junior Show June 2023
Langford Cunningham from Blind City Podcast and Felicia Hampton from The Freeman Bosley Junior Show June 2023

Langford Cunningham: Now let’s get right down to business. We got a lot of black girls missing in our city and we’re not getting a lot of media coverage. When I came out with black girls missing, I threw a human trafficking event at a local HBC School. Watch entire podcast interview on YouTube

According to the National Crime Information Center, a third of almost 300,000 females in the U.S. reported missing in 2020 were Black, often ignored by law enforcement and media.

Langford Cunningham: So anyway, we went through the event, the human trafficking event. We only had a couple of students show up, but a lot more people came through, and I thanked them for showing up on that rainy night. But I was very discouraged. We’re talking about black girls missing and the school didn’t know how to promote it to the students. So I couldn’t believe the disconnect with the students and the staff at the school. Watch entire podcast interview on YouTube

Langford Cunningham from Blind City Podcast and Felicia Hampton from The Freeman Bosley Junior Show June 2023

According to the National Crime Information Center, a third of the almost 300,000 females in the U.S. reported missing in 2020 were Black, often ignored by law enforcement and media.

The reasons for people going missing vary widely. Some people run away from home, while others are abducted or trafficked. Some people may have mental health issues or substance abuse problems that lead them to go missing. And in some cases, people simply disappear without a trace.

The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) is a database that helps law enforcement agencies track missing persons cases. NamUs also provides resources for families of missing loved ones.

Senator Karla May: Well, you know, in the state legislature, every year, Senator Jamilah Nasheed had a large event in the rotunda of the Capitol in reference to African-American girls missing in the community. And I don’t know if she’s still throwing that event, but she always had that event to make us all aware including placing flyers all over the Capitol.

Langford Cunningham from Blind City Podcast at The Freeman Bosley Jr. Show
Langford Cunningham from Blind City Podcast at The Freeman Bosley Jr. Show

Langford Cunningham: And that’s beautiful. And we need more of that. We got a young lady missing now named Natalie Turner. Thanks to Channel 4 News, they reached out to me. Thank you to Jennifer Bloom and Wendy Weese. You’re noticing all the people that I’m talking about. They don’t look like us. I said, to the Attorney General, stop the witch hunt on Kim Gardner and execute a manhunt for these 200 black girls missing out of Berkeley, Missouri.

Mayor Freeman Bosley Junior on Radio Show at iHeartMEDIA St. Louis
Mayor Freeman Bosley Junior on Radio Show at iHeartMEDIA St. Louis

Mayor Freeman Bosley Junior: Stop the witch hunt, execute a manhunt.

Langford Cunningham: The people that supported me with that event were a lot of white people and the black people, of course, came out but not all, not 100% of the black community. And I was very disturbed about that because these are the mothers and the future mothers of our community and we’re not standing up for them, the missing girls.

Anthony Shahid: Would you tell us about Ruth Richardson too?

Langford Cunningham: Oh yeah, Ruth Richardson in Minnesota. So what I did, I started reaching outside St. Louis.

Senator Karla May: The legislature in the Minnesota House.

Langford Cunningham: And we just lost a young girl. I don’t want to say her name because, you know, she just killed herself because somebody put a Molly in her drink and she never recovered. She started having mental health issues. And there are people out there putting Mickies in these young girls drinks in these clubs. Let me talk to the strippers out there. Let me talk to the strippers because y’all are flooding them strip clubs in Illinois. Because I know I used to be caught up in them. I was a pure advocate. So I know what I’m talking about. I’ve been there. I’m not there anymore more, but I’ve been there. But there’s a lot of human trafficking going through these clubs and a lot of young girls up in there 15, 14 years old. Watch entire podcast interview on YouTube

Langford Cunningham: That’s right, Karla May. And she created a task force in Minnesota and got a bill passed called Human Trafficking Black Girls Missing. It’s the first bill in the United States. So I hope the Mosley’s in Jeff City and the other people in Jeff City working along with you, Carla May, can understand that this is the blueprint. Now, we have a blueprint what to go for in our state, hopefully. And also California has picked up the Ebony Amber Alert for black girls being taken and gone. So other cities are catching on to this. So I hope Missouri can get in line for this.

Left to Right: Senator Karla May, Anthony Shahid, Freeman Bosley Jr. Langford Cunningham, Felicia Hampton on the The Freeman Bosley Jr. Show June 2023
Left to Right: Senator Karla May, Anthony Shahid, Freeman Bosley Jr. Langford Cunningham, Felicia Hampton on the The Freeman Bosley Jr. Show June 2023

Anthony Shahid: That’s why you got to keep up with these little sisters because I know they want to go out and party and doing all these little things, but you got to remember they are getting snatched. And then they also turn into the body parts. You know, so I’m really thankful that you’re talking about this. Watch entire podcast interview on YouTube

Senator Karla May: No, you’re absolutely right. They do use them for body parts and take them out while they’re still alive. That’s why they encourage them to go in groups and stay in groups when you’re traveling. But let me also say this. I encountered this. I think it was either my last year in the House or my first year as senator. It was a young girl that was missing, African-American girl that was missing. And, you know, she had a bunch of brothers and sisters. They found her in a house, a vacant house that they were squatting in on page, in the bathtub, chained right in the neighborhood. And the story was that she had was led there by a young lady who befriended her. And then this young lady and her would go out and kick it. And she built up the trust with this young lady. And then at some point, the young lady gave her a bottle of water to drink and drugged her. And that’s how she got taken.

Felicia Hampton: You have to have the discussions with the children and, you know, just make them aware that what can happen. All your friends are not your friends, you know.

Felicia Hampton: You know, I think about a young girl by the name of Phoenix Colton. Phoenix lived in our neighborhood. She was a friend of my daughter’s and she came up missing in December 2011. She was in her driveway and it’s been over 10 years. They have not found her. She just disappeared. I’m glad they have an Ebony alert in California now, because the response in the City of St. Louis when a black girl comes up missing doesn’t get the same response.

Senator Karla May: Well, and then they use this excuse of age and they’ll try to say, well, they ran away, that’s what they use. That’s the discriminatory part, because when it’s a young, you know, uh, Caucasian female, the response is much different. They bring in the helicopters and the bloodhounds.

Langford Cunningham: I got some stats for you. In the United States, we have over 75,000 missing as of today. There are five black women killed per day in America, per day, Monday through Sunday, five black women killed per day. Ruth Richardson gave these statistics to me. And you can go to blindcitypodcast.com, and see episode 59 with Ruth Richardson. Watch entire podcast interview on YouTube

Whatever issue you have with Langford Cunningham, you can go to BlindCitySTL@gmail.com or you can come on ABC’s platform, Blind City Podcast and step your ass into the lion’s den. Watch entire podcast interview on YouTube

If you suspect someone may be a victim of human trafficking or have information about potential trafficking activities, it is crucial to report it to the authorities. You can contact your local law enforcement agency or the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888. The hotline is available 24/7 and can provide assistance, resources, and guidance in suspected cases of human trafficking.